Walter Lord

1 A Night to Remember

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  History  Books  Nonfiction  Transportation  Professional & Technical  Engineering 
Price :  $11.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>#1 <i>New York Times</i> Bestseller: The definitive account of the sinking of the Titanic, based on interviews with survivors.</b><br /> &#xa0;At first, no one but the lookout recognized the sound. Passengers described it as the impact of a heavy wave, a scraping noise, or the tearing of a long calico strip. In fact, it was the sound of the world’s most famous ocean liner striking an iceberg, and it served as the death knell for 1,500 souls.&#xa0;In the next two hours and forty minutes, the maiden voyage of the <i>Titanic</i> became one of history’s worst maritime accidents. As the ship’s deck slipped closer to the icy waterline, women pleaded with their husbands to join them on lifeboats. Men changed into their evening clothes to meet death with dignity. And in steerage, hundreds fought bitterly against certain death. At 2:15 a.m. the ship’s band played “Autumn.” Five minutes later, the <i>Titanic</i> was gone.&#xa0;Based on interviews with sixty-three survivors, Lord’s moment-by-moment account is among the finest books written about one of the twentieth century’s bleakest nights.&#xa0;“[<i>A Night to Remember</i>] is a book that I will never forget.” —Edward S. Kamuda, Titanic Historical Society President&#xa0;“A stunning book, incomparably the best on its subject and one of the most exciting books of this or any year.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“Absolutely gripping and un-put-downable.” —David McCullough, author of <i>John Adams</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

2 The Miracle of Dunkirk

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History  Europe 
Price :  $11.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>The true story of the World War II evacuation portrayed in the Christopher Nolan film <i>Dunkirk</i>, by the #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author of <i>Day of Infamy</i>.</b><br /><br /> In May 1940, the remnants of the French and British armies, broken by Hitler’s blitzkrieg, retreated to Dunkirk. Hemmed in by overwhelming Nazi strength, the 338,000 men gathered on the beach were all that stood between Hitler and Western Europe. Crush them, and the path to Paris and London was clear.<br /><br /> Unable to retreat any farther, the Allied soldiers set up defense positions and prayed for deliverance. Prime Minister Winston Churchill ordered an evacuation on May 26, expecting to save no more than a handful of his men. But Britain would not let its soldiers down. Hundreds of fishing boats, pleasure yachts, and commercial vessels streamed into the Channel to back up the Royal Navy, and in a week nearly the entire army was ferried safely back to England.<br /><br /> Based on interviews with hundreds of survivors and told by “a master narrator,” <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i> is a striking history of a week when the outcome of World War II hung in the balance (Arthur Schlesinger Jr.).<br /><br /> “Stirring . . . The difference between the Lord technique and that of any number of academic historians is the originality of his reportage.” —<i>The New York Times</i><br /> &#xa0;<br /> “Lively and interesting&#xa0;.&#xa0;.&#xa0;. A good tale, skillfully told&#xa0;.&#xa0;.&#xa0;. [<i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i>] is the most complete and readable account yet to appear.” —<i>The Christian Science Monitor</i><br /> &#xa0;<br /> “Amazing and unexpected heroism . . . Well worth reading.” —<i>Milwaukee Sentinel </i><br /> &#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

3 Incredible Victory

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History 
Price :  $11.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b><i>New York Times</i> Bestseller: Outgunned and outmanned on the Pacific Ocean, a small American fleet defied the odds and turned the tide of World War II.</b>&#xa0;On the morning of June 4, 1942, doom sailed on Midway. Hoping to put itself within striking distance of Hawaii and California, the Japanese navy planned an ambush that would obliterate the remnants of the American Pacific fleet. On paper, the Americans had no chance of winning. They had fewer ships, slower fighters, and almost no battle experience. But because their codebreakers knew what was coming, the American navy was able to prepare an ambush of its own.&#xa0;Over two days of savage battle, American sailors and pilots broke the spine of the Japanese war machine. The United States prevailed against momentous odds; never again did Japan advance. In stunning detail, Walter Lord,&#xa0;the #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author of <i>Day of Infamy </i>and <i>A Night to Remember</i>, tells the story of one of the greatest upsets in naval history.&#xa0;“Graphic and realistic . . . not an impersonalized account of moves on the chessboard of war, [but] a story of individual people facing crucial problems.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“[Lord uses] a kind of literary pointillism, the arrangement of contrasting bits of fact and emotion in such a fashion that a vividly real impression of an event is conveyed to the reader.” —<i>New York Herald Tribune</i>&#xa0;“Walter was a giant, there is no other way to describe him.” —John Maxtone-Graham, author of <i>Titanic Tragedy</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

4 Day of Infamy

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History  United States 
Price :  $11.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>The #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling account: “There have been many books on Pearl Harbor .&#xa0;.&#xa0;. but none of them have equaled Lord’s” (Stephen E. Ambrose).</b><br /> &#xa0;The Day of Infamy began as a quiet morning on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. But as Japan’s deadly torpedoes suddenly rained down on the Pacific fleet, soldiers, generals, and civilians alike felt shock, then fear, then rage. From the chaos, a thousand personal stories of courage emerged. Drawn from hundreds of interviews, letters, and diaries, Walter Lord recounts the many tales of heroism and tragedy by those who experienced the attack firsthand. From the musicians of the USS <i>Nevada</i> who insisted on finishing “The Star Spangled Banner” before taking cover, to the men trapped in the capsized USS <i>Oklahoma</i> who methodically voted on the best means of escape, each story conveys the terror and confusion of the bombing raid, as well as the fortitude of those who survived.&#xa0;“The story of a major American defeat that contains so many examples of courage that it will undoubtedly make American readers proud of their countrymen.” —<i>The New York Times</i><i>&#xa0;</i>“The carefully planned hour-by-hour recording of the surprise assault on Pearl Harbor . . . is as engrossing as the story of the sinking of the <i>Titanic</i> and more harrowing.” —<i>The Atlantic</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

5 Lonely Vigil

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History  World 
Price :  $11.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>From the bestselling author of <i>Day of Infamy</i>: In the bloodiest island combat of WWII, one group of men kept watch from behind Japanese lines.</b><br /> &#xa0;The Solomon Islands was where the Allied war machine finally broke the Japanese empire. As pilots, marines, and sailors fought for supremacy in Guadalcanal, Bougainville, and the Slot, a lonely group of radio operators occupied the Solomon Islands’ highest points. Sometimes encamped in comfort, sometimes exposed to the elements, these coastwatchers kept lookout for squadrons of Japanese bombers headed for Allied positions, holding their own positions even when enemy troops swarmed all around.&#xa0;They were Australian-born but Solomon-raised, and adept at survival in the unforgiving jungle environment. Through daring and insight, they stayed one step ahead of the Japanese, often sacrificing themselves to give advance warning of an attack.<br /><br /> In <i>Lonely Vigil</i>, Walter Lord, the #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author of <i>A Night to Remember</i> and <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i>, tells of the survivors of the campaign and what they risked to win the war in the Pacific.&#xa0;“Sure fire . . . a rich haul of stories, involving hairbreadth escapes and rescues, cool heroism and exotic adventure.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“A stirring tale of forgotten heroes, splendidly told by a master narrator.” —Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.&#xa0;“I knew some of these valiant men well. Walter Lord has brought them to life again.” —Samuel B. Griffith II, Brigadier General USMC (retired)&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

6 The Night Lives On

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  History  Books  Nonfiction  Transportation  Professional & Technical  Engineering 
Price :  $7.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>In this <i>New York Times</i> bestseller, the author of <i>A Night to Remember</i> and <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i> revisits the <i>Titanic</i> disaster.</b><br /> &#xa0;<br /> Walter Lord’s <i>A Night to Remember</i> was a landmark work that recounted the harrowing events of April 14, 1912, when the British ocean liner RMS <i>Titanic</i> went down in the North Atlantic Ocean, a book that inspired a classic movie of the same name. In <i>The Night Lives On</i>, Lord takes the exploration further, revealing information about the ship’s last hours that emerged in the decades that followed, and separating myths from facts.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> Was the ship really christened before setting sail on its maiden voyage? What song did the band play as water spilled over the bow? How did the ship’s wireless operators fail so badly, and why did the nearby <i>Californian</i>, just ten miles away when the <i>Titanic</i> struck the iceberg, not come to the rescue? Lord answers these questions and more, in a gripping investigation of the night when approximately 1,500 victims were lost to the sea.<br /> &#xa0;“Spellbinding.” —<i>The Boston Globe </i>&#xa0;“Stunning . . . his detection and discoveries make a first-class historical reconstruction and a model in the research and writing of that difficult art.” —Barbara Tuchman, author of <i>A Distant Mirror</i>&#xa0;“A popular historian who [wrote] books with the brisk flourishes of a first-class reporter.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

7 The Fremantle Diary

Author : Walter Lord & James Fremantle
Genre :  Biographies & Memoirs  Books  History  United States  Military 
Price :  $1.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>The fascinating diary of English colonel James Fremantle, who spent three months behind Confederate lines at the height of the American Civil War</b>Three hours after stepping onto American soil, James Fremantle saw his first corpse: that of a bandit lynched for taunting Confederate officers. But Fremantle was not shocked by this grisly introduction to the Civil War. On leave from Her Majesty’s army, the Colonel had come to tour the fight, and see firsthand the gallant Southerners about whom he had read. In the next three months, he witnessed some of the most monumental moments of the entire war.&#xa0;Starting on the war’s western fringe, Fremantle worked his way east, arriving on the Confederate lines in time for Gettysburg, which he watched with a telescope in a tree outside the tent of General Hood. Along the way he met Robert E. Lee, P. G. T. Beauregard, Jefferson Davis, and nearly every other Confederate leader at the time. Including an insightful introduction and notes by bestselling author Walter Lord, <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> is an elegant memoir and intimate portrait of one of the nation’s most savage conflicts.“Richly rewarding. . . . Takes its rightful place among the standard works on the Civil War.” —<i>The Christian Science Monitor</i>&#xa0;“Wonderfully illuminating.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“[Lord] was a giant, there is no other way to describe him.” —John Maxtone-Graham, author of <i>Titanic Tragedy</i>Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

8 The Complete Titanic Chronicles

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  History  Books  Professional & Technical  Engineering  Nonfiction  Transportation 
Price :  $12.99
Release Date :  2013-03-26
Description :  <b>The complete story of the sinking of the <i>Titanic</i>, told by Walter Lord in two acclaimed and riveting chronicles of the ship’s doomed maiden voyage</b><br />In just two hours and forty minutes, 1,500 souls were lost at sea when the RMS<i> Titanic </i>succumbed to the icy waters of the North Atlantic. Based on interviews with sixty-three survivors, <i>A Night to Remember</i> tells the story of that fateful night, offering a meticulous and engrossing look at one of the twentieth century’s most infamous disasters.&#xa0;In <i>The Night Lives On</i>, Lord revisits the unsinkable ship, diving into the multitude of theories—both factual and fanciful—about the <i>Titanic</i>’s last hours. Was the ship really christened before setting sail on its maiden voyage? How did its wireless operators fail so badly, and why did the nearby <i>Californian</i>, just ten miles away when the <i>Titanic</i> struck the iceberg, not come to the rescue?&#xa0;Together for the first time, Lord’s classic bestseller<i> A Night to Remember</i> and his subsequent study <i>The Night Lives On </i>offer remarkable insight into the maritime catastrophe that continues to fascinate and horrify a full century later. <br /><i><br />A Night to Remember</i>:“[<i>A Night to Remember</i>] is a book that I will never forget.” —Edward S. Kamuda, Titanic Historical Society President&#xa0;“A stunning book, incomparably the best on its subject and one of the most exciting books of this or any year.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“Absolutely gripping and un-put-downable.” —David McCullough, author of <i>John Adams</i>&#xa0;<i>The Night Lives On</i>:“Spellbinding.” —<i>The Boston Globe </i>&#xa0;“Stunning . . . his detection and discoveries make a first-class historical reconstruction and a model in the research and writing of that difficult art.” —Barbara Tuchman, author of <i>A Distant Mirror</i>&#xa0;“A popular historian who [wrote] books with the brisk flourishes of a first-class reporter.” —<i>The New York Times</i><br />Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965).&#xa0;&#xa0; &#xa0; &#xa0;

9 Peary to the Pole

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  History  Books  Biographies & Memoirs 
Price :  $7.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>The story of explorer Robert E. Peary’s quest for the North Pole, a true Arctic adventure from the #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author of <i>A Night to Remember</i>.</b><br /><br /> &#xa0;On March 1, 1909, only 413 miles of formidable ice separated Robert E. Peary from realizing his lifelong dream of becoming the first man to set foot on the North Pole. On that dark morning on Canada’s Ellesmere Island, it was cold enough to freeze a bottle of brandy. The ice looked solid enough, but it sat atop seawater—and shifted violently according to the whims of the ocean below.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> Peary was used to the conditions—he’d barely survived them just three years before when he first tried, and failed, to reach the earth’s northernmost point. But this time around, no amount of peril could dissuade Peary and his party from their expedition. With a cry of “Forward, march!” the journey of a lifetime began.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> Written with thrilling detail and heart-pounding suspense by the author of <i>Day of Infamy</i> and other bestselling histories, <i>Peary to the Pole </i>is the definitive account of one man’s trek through some of the world’s most treacherous terrain, in search of adventure, discovery, and immortality, a classic for readers of books like <i>In the Kingdom of Ice</i> or <i>The Last Place on Earth</i>. &#xa0;“In writing <i>Peary to the Pole</i>, Walter Lord had to face problems more complex than in any of his adult books about the Titanic disaster, Pearl Harbor or the Alamo. . . . A sound, thorough job.” —<i>The New York Times Book Review </i>&#xa0;“A master narrator.” —Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.&#xa0;“Walter was a giant, there is no other way to describe him.” —John Maxtone-Graham, author of <i>Titanic Tragedy</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

10 The World War II Collection

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History 
Price :  $3.99
Release Date :  2016-06-28
Description :  <b>Full-length accounts of three decisive WWII events—Pearl Harbor, Midway, and the evacuation of Dunkirk—from a #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author.</b><br /><br /> In May 1940, the remnants of the French and British armies, broken by Hitler’s blitzkrieg, retreated to the beach at Dunkirk. Prime Minister Winston Churchill ordered an evacuation on May 26, expecting to save no more than a handful of his men. But Britain would not let its soldiers down. Hundreds of fishing boats, pleasure yachts, and commercial vessels streamed into the Channel to back up the Royal Navy. <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i> is a striking history of a week when the fate of Britain—and the World—hung in the balance.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> On the morning of June 4, 1942, doom sailed on Midway. Hoping to put itself within striking distance of Hawaii and California, the Japanese navy planned an ambush that would obliterate the remnants of the American Pacific fleet. On paper, the Americans had no chance of winning. But because their code breakers knew what was coming, the American navy was able to prepare an ambush of its own. In <i>Incredible Victory</i>, Walter Lord recounts two days of savage battle, during which a small American fleet defied the odds and turned the tide of World War II.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> December 7, 1941, began as a quiet morning on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. But as Japan’s deadly torpedoes suddenly rained down on the Pacific fleet, soldiers, generals, and civilians alike felt shock, then fear, and then rage. From the chaos, a thousand personal stories of courage emerged. Drawn from hundreds of interviews, letters, and diaries, Walter Lord’s <i>Day of Infamy</i> recounts the many tales of heroism and tragedy of those who experienced the attack firsthand.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> These three acclaimed war chronicles showcase Walter Lord at the top of his game as a narrative nonfiction master.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i></b><br /> “Stirring .&#xa0;.&#xa0;. The difference between the Lord technique and that of any number of academic historians is the originality of his reportage. .&#xa0;.&#xa0;. Contemporary history at its most readable.” —<i>The New York Times</i><br /> &#xa0;<br /><b>Praise for <i>Incredible Victory</i></b><br /> “Graphic and realistic .&#xa0;.&#xa0;. Not an impersonalized account of moves on the chessboard of war, [but] a story of individual people facing crucial problems.” —<i>The New York Times</i><br /> &#xa0;<br /><b>Praise for <i>Day of Infamy</i></b><br /> “There have been many books on Pearl Harbor .&#xa0;.&#xa0;. but none of them have equaled Lord’s.” —Stephen E. Ambrose, author of <i>Band of Brothers</i><br /><br /> Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

11 A Time to Stand

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  United States  Books  History  Military 
Price :  $8.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>The #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author of <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i> tells the story of the Texans who fought Santa Anna’s troops at the Battle of the Alamo.</b>&#xa0;Looking out over the walls of the whitewashed Alamo, sweltering in the intense sun of a February heat wave, Colonel William Travis knew his small garrison had little chance of holding back the Mexican army. Even after a call for reinforcements brought dozens of Texans determined to fight for their fledgling republic, the cause remained hopeless. Gunpowder was scarce, food was running out, and the compound was too large to easily defend with less than two hundred soldiers. Still, given the choice, only one man opted to surrender. The rest resolved to fight and die. After thirteen days, the Mexicans charged, and the Texans were slaughtered.&#xa0;In exquisite detail, Walter Lord recreates the fight to uphold the Texan flag. He sheds light not just on frontier celebrities like Jim Bowie and Davy Crockett, but on the ordinary soldiers who died alongside them. Though the fight ended two centuries ago, the men of the Alamo will never be forgotten.&#xa0;“An excellent combination of popular writing with careful scholarship.” —<i>Library Journal</i>&#xa0;“Probably the best of all Alamo accounts . . . a history which should last.” —<i>The New York Times Book Review</i>&#xa0;“[Lord had] the extraordinary ability to bring the past to life.” —Jenny Lawrence, author of <i>The Way It Was: Walter Lord on His Life and Books</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

12 The Dawn's Early Light

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History  United States 
Price :  $8.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>It took more than a revolution to win true independence: The story of the War of 1812, the United State’s second war on England, by a <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling historian. </b><br /> &#xa0;<br /> At the dawn of the nineteenth century, the great powers of Western Europe treated the United States like a disobedient child. Great Britain blocked American trade, seized its vessels, and impressed its sailors to serve in the Royal Navy. America’s complaints were ignored, and the humiliation continued until James Madison, the country’s fourth president, declared a second war on Great Britain.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> British forces would descend on the young United States, shattering its armies and burning its capital, but America rallied, and survived the conflict with its sovereignty intact. With stunning detail on land and naval battles, the role Native Americans played in the hostilities, and the larger backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars, this is the story of the turning points of this strange conflict, which inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” and led to the Era of Good Feelings that all but erased partisan politics in America for almost a decade. It was in 1812 that America found its identity and first assumed its place on the world stage.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> By the author of <i>A Night to Remember</i>, the classic account of the sinking of the Titanic—which was not only made into a 1958 movie but also led director James Cameron to use Lord as a consultant on his epic 1997 film—as well as acclaimed volumes on Pearl Harbor (<i>Day of Infamy</i>) and the Battle of Midway (<i>Incredible Victory</i>), this is a fascinating look at an oft-forgotten chapter in American history.&#xa0;“A vivid, racy study . . . always authentic . . . continuously readable, often exciting, and occasionally brilliant.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“[Lord uses] a kind of literary pointillism, the arrangement of contrasting bits of fact and emotion in such a fashion that a vividly real impression of an event is conveyed to the reader.” —<i>New York Herald Tribune</i>&#xa0;“Walter was a giant, there is no other way to describe him.” —John Maxtone-Graham, author of <i>Titanic Tragedy</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

13 The Past That Would Not Die

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Politics & Current Events  Books  Nonfiction  Social Science  History  United States 
Price :  $7.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>Lord’s history of the 1962 Ole Miss riots, sparked by one man’s heroic stance against segregation in the American South</b><b>&#xa0;</b>On September 30, 1962, James H. Meredith matriculated at the University of Mississippi in Oxford. An air force veteran with sixty hours of transfer credits, Meredith would have been welcomed were it not for the color of his skin. As the first African-American student to register at a previously segregated school, however, he risked his life. The Supreme Court had determined that Oxford’s university must desegregate, and several hundred federal marshals came to support Meredith. It would not be enough. As President Kennedy called for peace, a riot exploded in Oxford. By eleven o’clock that night, the marshals were out of tear gas. By midnight, the highway patrol had pulled out, gunfire was spreading, and Kennedy was forced to send in the army.&#xa0;In this definitive history, Walter Lord argues that the riot was not an isolated incident, but a manifestation of racial hatred that was wrapped up in the state’s identity, stretching all the way back to the Civil War.“[Lord’s] account of the gathering storm at Oxford and Jackson is a marvel.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“A master narrator.” —Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.&#xa0;“[Lord uses] a kind of literary pointillism, the arrangement of contrasting bits of fact and emotion in such a fashion that a vividly real impression of an event is conveyed to the reader.” —<i>New York Herald Tribune</i>Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

14 World in Crisis

Author : Walter Lord, William Craig & Richard Tregaskis
Genre :  Military  Books  History  Biographies & Memoirs 
Price :  $17.99
Release Date :  2017-11-28
Description :  <b>Three <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling World War II histories, including the true story of the miraculous evacuation portrayed in the Christopher Nolan film <i>Dunkirk</i>.</b><br /><br /> The monumental scope and breathtaking heroism of World War II are brought to vivid life in three riveting accounts that span the conflict’s Western Front, Eastern Front, and Pacific Theater.<br /> &#xa0;<br /><i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i>: The definitive account of the evacuation of 338,000 British and French soldiers from the beaches of Dunkirk. Based on interviews with hundreds of survivors and masterfully woven together into a cinematic portrait, <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i> captures a pivotal moment when the outcome of World War II hung in the balance. “Stunning .&#xa0;.&#xa0;.&#xa0;The difference between the Lord technique and that of any number of academic historians is the originality of his reportage” (<i>The New York Times</i>).<br /> &#xa0;<br /><i>Enemy at the Gates</i>: <i>New York Times</i> bestseller and the inspiration for the 2001 film starring Joseph Fiennes and Jude Law. Considered by many historians to be the turning point of World War II in Europe, the Soviet Army’s victory in the Battle of Stalingrad foreshadowed Nazi Germany’s downfall and the rise of a communist superpower. <i>Enemy at the Gates</i> is “probably the best single work on the epic battle of Stalingrad .&#xa0;.&#xa0;.&#xa0;An unforgettable and haunting reading experience” (Cornelius Ryan, author of <i>The Longest Day</i>).<br /> &#xa0;<br /><i>Guadalcanal Diary</i>: #1<i> New York Times </i>bestseller and the basis for the 1943 film starring Anthony Quinn and Richard Conte. Richard Tregaskis was one of two journalists to witness the invasion of Guadalcanal, the first major Allied offensive against Japanese forces and the first time in history that a combined air, land, and sea assault had ever been attempted. Hailed by the <i>New York Times </i>as “one of the literary events of its time,” <i>Guadalcanal Diary </i>is “a superb example of war reporting at its best” (Mark Bowden, author of <i>Black Hawk Down</i>).<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>The Miracle of Dunkirk</i></b><br /> “Lively .&#xa0;.&#xa0;.&#xa0;The most complete and readable account yet to appear.”<b><i> —</i></b><i>The Christian Science Monitor</i><br /> &#xa0;<br /><b>Praise for <i>Enemy at the Gates</i></b><br /> “Here is the drama, the terror, the horror, and the heroism of the greatest military encounter of our time.” —Harrison E. Salisbury<br /> &#xa0;<br /><b>Praise for <i>Guadalcanal Diary</i></b><br /> “One of the best books of the war.” —<i>The Philadelphia Inquirer</i><br /><br /> Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. His books include <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965).&#xa0;&#xa0; &#xa0; &#xa0;<br /> &#xa0;<br /> William Craig (1929–1997) was an American historian and novelist. He published his first book, <i>The Fall of Japan</i>, in 1967. A narrative history of the final weeks of&#xa0;World War II&#xa0;in the Pacific, it reached the top ten on the&#xa0;<i>New York Times</i>&#xa0;bestseller list. In order to write&#xa0;<i>Enemy at the Gates&#xa0;</i>(1973), a documentary account of the Battle of Stalingrad, Craig travelled to three continents and interviewed hundreds of military and civilian survivors.<br /> &#xa0;<br /> Richard Tregaskis (1916–1973) was a journalist and award-winning author best known for <i>Guadalcanal Diary </i>(1943), his bestselling chronicle of the US Marine Corps invasion of the Solomon Islands during World War II. His other books include <i>Invasion Diary </i>(1944), <i>X-15 Diary </i>(1961), <i>John F. Kennedy and PT-109 </i>(1962), and <i>Vietnam Diary </i>(1963).

15 The Way It Was

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Biographies & Memoirs  Books 
Price :  $4.99
Release Date :  2009-07-03
Description :  Walter Lord's A Night to Remember is a minute-by-minute account of the Titanic's final hours. Lord wrote 12 books, honing a vivid eye-witness approach to history, whether it was Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor (Day of Infamy) or the defense of the Alamo (A Time to Stand) or the Battle of Midway (Incredible Victory). In The Way It Was, Lord tells his own story, about his life and books.

16 The Good Years: From 1900 to the First World War [Illustrated Edition]

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  Military  Books  History  United States 
Price :  $4.99
Release Date :  2015-11-06
Description :  Includes more than 25 illustrations<br />WALTER LORD NEVER STARTS FROM SCRATCH. For months before a word of this book was written, he could be found roaming the country, ferreting out the fascinating people who helped shape these years. One week it might be Elijah Baum, who piloted Wilbur Wright to his first lodgings at Kitty Hawk…the next, and old fireman who fought the flames at San Francisco…the next, some militant suffragette.<br /><br />Even in his raids on old diaries, letters, memoirs and newspapers, Mr. Lord usually headed straight for the scene. He was as likely to be found in an attic with a flashlight as at a desk with a pencil. That’s why the book is full of such fresh discoveries: secret Pinkerton reports on a famous murder, unpublished notes left by McKinley’s physician, the caterer’s instructions for Mrs. Astor’s ball, and many other factors unknown to the participants themselves.<br /><br />It’s his loving attention to first-hand sources that makes Mr. Lord’s books so vivid for the thousands who read them.<br /><br />Editorial Reviews:<br />“Informative and entertaining...although The Good Years is naturally and properly selective, it still achieves something of a panoramic effect.” —The New York Times<br /><br />“[Lord uses] a kind of literary pointillism, the arrangement of contrasting bits of fact and emotion in such a fashion that a vividly real impression of an event is conveyed to the reader.” —New York Herald Tribune<br /><br />“[Lord had] the extraordinary ability to bring the past to life.” —Jenny Lawrence, author of The Way It Was: Walter Lord on His Life and Books

17 Titanic

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  History  Books  Nonfiction  Transportation 
Price :  $7.99
Release Date :  2012-03-15
Description :  Quello di Walter Lord è il resoconto più fedele e toccante del più grande disastro marittimo del Novecento. A Titanic. La vera storia fanno infatti riferimento tutte le ricostruzioni anche cinematografiche - dal film di Kenneth More Titanic, latitudine 41 nord del 1958, al colossal pluripremiato di James Cameron del 1997 - che rievocano la notte del 14 aprile 1912, e le interminabili ore trascorse tra l'urto contro l'iceberg, alle 23,40, e la mattina seguente, quando i superstiti vennero soccorsi. Quella tragedia continua a commuovere il mondo intero: delle 2207 persone a bordo di quella nave «inaffondabile» se ne salvarono solo 705. Intervistando i superstiti con la spregiudicatezza e lo scrupolo del grande giornalista, ricostruendo i fatti con la precisione dello storico, Walter Lord racconta in presa diretta l'affondamento del Titanic. Illustra i risvolti tecnici, chiarisce dubbi e misteri; e soprattutto dà la parola a chi ha vissuto quell'evento in prima persona: milionari ed emigranti, ufficiali e marinai, donne e bambini. Pubblicato per la prima volta nel 1955 e immediatamente accolto con enorme successo, Titanic. La vera storia è la ricostruzione scrupolosa di quello che accadde nel gelido mare tranquillo, sotto un cielo stellato, in quella terribile notte.

18 The Good Years

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  United States  Books  History 
Price :  $11.99
Release Date :  2012-03-06
Description :  <b>This <i>New York Times</i> bestseller by the author of<i> A Night to Remember </i>explores America in the years between the Gilded Age and the beginning of the Great War.</b><br /> &#xa0;Though remarkable in their own right, the first fifteen years of the 1900s had the misfortune of being sandwiched between—and overshadowed by—the Gilded Age and the First World War. In <i>The Good Years</i>, Walter Lord remedies this neglect, bringing to vivid life the events of 1900 to 1914, when industrialization made staggering advances, and the Wright brothers captured the world’s imagination.&#xa0;Lord writes of Newport and Fifth Avenue, where the rich lived gaily and without much worry beyond the occasional economic panic. He also delves into the sweatshops of the second industrial revolution, where impoverished laborers and children suffered under unimaginable conditions. From the assassination of President McKinley to the hot and lazy “last summer” before the outbreak of war, Lord writes with insight and humor about the uniquely American energy and enthusiasm of those years before the Great War would forever change the world.<br /><br /> From the #1 <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author of <i>Incredible Victory</i> and <i>Day of Infamy</i>, this is an “informative and entertaining” journey through an often-overlooked period of history at the beginning of the twentieth century (<i>The New York Times</i>).&#xa0;“Informative and entertaining . . . although <i>The Good Years</i> is naturally and properly selective, it still achieves something of a panoramic effect.” —<i>The New York Times</i>&#xa0;“[Lord uses] a kind of literary pointillism, the arrangement of contrasting bits of fact and emotion in such a fashion that a vividly real impression of an event is conveyed to the reader.” —<i>New York Herald Tribune</i>&#xa0;“[Lord had] the extraordinary ability to bring the past to life.” —Jenny Lawrence, author of <i>The Way It Was: Walter Lord on His Life and Books</i>&#xa0;Walter Lord (1917–2002) was an acclaimed and bestselling author of literary nonfiction best known for his gripping and meticulously researched accounts of watershed historical events. Born in Baltimore, Lord went to work for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. After the war’s end, Lord joined a New York advertising firm, and began writing nonfiction in his spare time. His first book was <i>The Fremantle Diary</i> (1954), a volume of Civil War diaries that became a surprising success. But it was Lord’s next book, <i>A Night to Remember</i> (1955), that made him famous. The bestseller caused a new flurry of interest in the <i>Titanic</i> and inspired the 1958 film of the same name. Lord went on to use the book’s interview-heavy format as a template for most of his following works, which included detailed reconstructions of the Pearl Harbor attack in <i>Day of Infamy </i>(1957), the battle of Midway in <i>Incredible Victory </i>(1967), and the integration of the University of Mississippi in <i>The Past That Would Not Die </i>(1965). In all, he published a dozen books.

19 Titanic

Author : Walter Lord
Genre :  History  Books 
Price :  $6.99
Release Date :  2016-04-18
Description :  Walter Lord przenosi nas na pokład tonącego statku, opisując minuta po minucie poruszającą historię walki o przetrwanie ponad dwóch tysięcy pasażerów. Dramat fatalnej nocy z 14 na 15 kwietnia 1912 roku opowiedziany jest z punktu widzenia mostku kapitańskiego, salonów pierwszej klasy i pasażerów tłoczących się na najniższych pokładach.<br /> Walter Lord towarzyszy swoim bohaterom od chwili zderzenia z górą lodową aż do ich śmierci w lodowatych wodach Atlantyku lub ocalenia w szalupach ratunkowych, pokazując akty heroicznej odwagi i tchórzostwa, ale przede wszystkim dając czytelnikom poczucie, że sami są uczestnikami tragedii, która kosztowała życie ponad tysiąca pięciuset pasażerów i członków załogi transatlantyku, który miał być niezatapialny.



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